Photos: GB1 GameBird

See the aerobatic airplane in action, plus some of the features that set it apart.

Flying magazine's Pia Bergqvist recently had the chance to fly the GB1 GameBird, a new two-seat aerobatic airplane from Game Composites.

With some help from freestyle world aerobatic champion Rob Holland, we put the GameBird's performance capabilities to the test — and we weren't disappointed.

Check out some photos from our test flight at AirVenture 2016 in Oshkosh as well as some of the notable features that set this airplane apart from the rest.

GameBird GB1
If the GB1 GameBird with its superb handling qualities doesn’t put a smile on your face, no airplane will.Glenn Watson
GameBird GB1
Flying editor Pia Bergqvist and aerobatic pilot Rob Holland prep for a test ride.Jon Whittle
GameBird GB1
The composite airplane has an empty weight of just 1,290 pounds.Jon Whittle
GameBird GB1
To show the ultimate edge of slow flight, aerobatic pilot Rob Holland applied tons of power, demonstrated a roll at zero airspeed, and came out without any altitude loss.Glenn Watson
GameBird GB1
While the GB1 is flown from the rear seat, the forward visibility is decent.Jon Whittle
GameBird GB1
On each side of the empennage is a ballast chamber that allows for a quick CG change.Jon Whittle
GameBird GB1
A four-blade, wood-core/composite MT-Propeller prop cuts down on the GameBird's noise.Jon Whittle
GameBird Angle of Attack
An AOA probe is attached to the oversize pitot tube.Jon Whittle
GameBird GB1
Rob Holland pushed the edge of the GameBird's flight envelope at Oshkosh this year.Glenn Watson