Safety Against the Odds

Despite its futuristic arsenal and high-stakes missions, the United States Air Force had a safety record in 2009 that approached perfection. The truth is, zero accidents is precisely the goal.

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The F-22 is the world's most advanced fighter.U.S. Air Force
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This HH-1 Huey wreckage is used for training in the U.S. Air Force Aircraft Mishap Investigation Course and International Flight Safety Officer Course.U.S. Air Force
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Flying's Robert Goyer (far right) is welcomed at the Safety Center by (l-r) Lt. Col./Dr. Karen Heupel, chief of human factors; Maj. Gen. Frederick F. Roggero, chief of safety; and Col. Sid Mayeux, chief of aviation safety.U.S. Air Force
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The BASH programs help reduce bird-strike risk.
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This older F-16 canopy remained intact but still bowed inward from abird strike. New F-16 canopies withstand 500-plus-knot impacts with 4-pound birds.U.S. Air Force
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International Flight Safety Officer students inspect a T-38 wing for pre-impact damage.U.S. Air Force
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International Flight Safety Officer students inspect A-10 wreckage for causal evidence.U.S. Air Force
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Capt. Aaron Reid of the 333rd Fighter Squadron (right) explains to Maj. Gen. Frederick F. Roggero what to look for during a preflight inspection.U.S. Air Force