Garmin G1000 Ignites a New Passion

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Garmin G1000
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The two displays in the G1000 system are physically identical, containing all of the controls to operate all parts of the avionics system, including navigation, communication, terrain and traffic alerts, weather radar and, soon, the autopilot system. If one display should fail, all necessary information for continued IFR flight is presented on the other display.
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The G1000 system fits perfectly in the new Cessna 182 Skylane for 2004. Pneumatic airspeed and altimeter, and an electrically powered artificial horizon, serve as emergency backup should the G1000 or its attitude heading reference system suffer an unlikely catastrophic failure in flight.
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In this photo a basic navigation map with a north-up presentation is shown on the multifunction display of the G1000 system. Airspace features, such as regulated airspace, and major terrain features, such as highways and rivers, are in view.
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Instead of splitting the primary flight display (PFD) in half with attitude information at the top and lateral data below, Garmin uses the entire display to show attitude with the HSI portion superimposed over the brown "earth" display.
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The window on the PFD and the full display of the MFD below warn of high terrain with the red indicating terrain at or above the present elevation of the airplane.
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Cessna 182 Skylane