Tri-Pacer on Floats

Senior Editor Pia Bergqvist gets her seaplane ticket in Alaska.

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Senior Editor Pia Bergqvist recently completed her seaplane training in this Tri-Pacer on floats.
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She logged seven hours of training over two days before taking her check ride.
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"Getting my seaplane rating was one of the most exhilarating experiences I've had in the dozen or so years I've spent flying around in little airplanes," Pia said.
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She completed her training at Alaska Floats & Skis, set in the idyllic touristy village of Talkeetna in the pristine flatlands below Mount McKinley.
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There are no aerial maneuvers required for the add-on seaplane rating. But with all the extra drage created by the floats, the airplane behaves quite differently compared with a conventional airplane.
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The airplane is not only significantly slower, but also requires a great deal of right rudder.
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The water rudder handle is located on the floor near the manual flaps.
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Water rudders at the aft portion of the floats help steer the seaplane in the water.
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They must be retracted, however, prior to takeoff.
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For more, check out Pia's feature, "Seaplane Rating, Alaska Style."