Flying in Regulated Airspace

Each month, Flying answers questions about the new Sport Pilot/Light Sport Aircraft rule with assistance from the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA)

sp_606_1.jpg

Do you need the logbook endorsements for Class B, C and D airspace if you have a Commercial Pilot Certificate with instrument rating but are operating as a sport pilot with your driver's license as your medical?

No, holders of higher-level pilot certificates are exempt from the requirement for an airspace endorsement when operating at the sport pilot level. You have already had the appropriate training and have demonstrated your ability when being tested for the higher-level certificate. You simply need a current flight review recorded in your pilot logbook, just as you did when you were flying at the higher certificate level.

Remember that you are restricted to only the privileges and limitations of a sport pilot at those times when you are using your driver's license in lieu of an FAA medical certificate. This includes flying only aircraft that meet the definition of a light-sport aircraft.

I thought that the LSA Repairman Certificate with inspection rating allows one to do annual condition inspections only on E-LSA aircraft owned by the certificate holder. Does this certificate also allow an owner of an S-LSA aircraft to do annual condition inspections on his own S-LSA, not just an owned E-LSA? I own an S-LSA and have been waiting to take the as yet non-existent 80-hour course for the LSA-Repairman-Maintenance certificate. If I can do inspections on my S-LSA with the inspection certificate, then I'll go ahead with that. My S-LSA is not used for commercial purposes, if that makes a difference. Please clarify this important issue for me.

The LSA Repairman certificate with an inspection rating does not allow the holder to perform condition inspections on aircraft certificated in the Light-Sport Aircraft category (commonly called "Special or S-LSA"). The inspection rating will only allow the holder to perform condition inspections on Experimental Light-Sport Aircraft (E-LSA) that he or she owns and that are listed on the certificate. 14 CFR 65.107(b) states:

(b) The holder of a repairman certificate (light-sport aircraft) with an inspection rating may perform the annual condition inspection on a light-sport aircraft:

(1) That is owned by the holder;

(2) That has been issued an experimental certificate for operating a light-sport aircraft under §21.191(i) of this chapter; and

(3) That is in the same class of light-sport aircraft for which the holder has completed the training specified in paragraph (a)(2)(ii) of this section.

This regulation clearly states, in item (b)(2), that the aircraft must hold an airworthiness certificate issued under §21.191(i), which is the experimental certificate. Light-Sport Aircraft category (S-LSA) are issued under §21.190, so the repairman certificate with inspection rating won't apply to those aircraft. 7

For more information on sport pilot, go to EAA's sport pilot website at www.sportpilot.org. EAA, which also hosts the annual EAA AirVenture fly-in at Oshkosh, provides in-depth information on the website, as well as a sport pilot hotline and complete membership services for all aviation enthusiasts. Call 800/ 564-6322 for membership information.