IS&S To Provide GPS Units for Boeing’s T-7A Red Hawk Trainer

Deliveries of the GPS units are slated to begin in July this year.

The Boeing T-7A Red Hawk is an advanced pilot training system developed to train the next generation of fighter and bomber pilots. [Courtesy: Boeing]

Innovative Solutions & Support (IS&S), a technology company based in Exton, Pennsylvania, has announced that it has received a production order from The Boeing Company to provide its GPS sensor units for the Boeing T-7A Red Hawk trainer. 

Deliveries for the GPS units are slated to begin in July this year, with additional options for continuous deliveries throughout the U.S. Air Force’s current program.

The Boeing T-7A Red Hawk is an advanced pilot training system developed to train the next generation of fighter and bomber pilots. Designed using a digital thread, the T-7A enables the integration of concepts and capabilities through virtual testing, saving time and expense.

This is the fourth OEM current production contract for IS&S, adding to an existing program with Boeing for its KC-46A, in addition to contracts with Pilatus Aircraft for its PC-24 and Textron Aviation for its Beechcraft King Airs.

The IS&S GPS/WAAS Beta-3 Receiver utilizes signals from the GPS satellite constellation and satellite-based augmentation systems, and it has been undergoing testing in the jet trainer for several years. The primary function of the receiver is to compute position, aircraft velocity, and time. In addition, the receiver can detect and exclude failed satellites using an autonomous integrity monitoring algorithm. 

“We are pleased to have our product on the T-7 which is the premier training platform for our next generation of Warfighters," IS&S said in a statement. "IS&S is proud to serve a broad array of aerospace customers with increasingly sophisticated and technically advanced products such as our GPS Sensor Unit. IS&S continues to develop a new generation of products which will meet the increasing demands of customers and regulators as requirements for air traffic management, fuel savings and environmentally friendly aircraft increase.”

Amy Wilder is managing editor for Plane & Pilot magazine. She fell in love with airplanes at age 8 when her brother-in-law took her up in a Cessna 172. Pretty soon, Amy's bedroom walls were covered with images of vintage airplanes and she was convinced she'd be a bush pilot in Alaska one day. She became a journalist instead, which is also somewhat impractical—but with fewer bears. Now she's working on her private pilot certificate and ready to be a lifelong student of the art of flying.

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