A Family Affair

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Kurt Bromschwig brings his D17S Staggerwing next to Steve Oxman’s Twin Beech photo plane for a family portrait.Photography By Russell Munson
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The original Model 35 Bonanza wind tunnel models are on display in the Bonanza/Baron building.Photography By Russell Munson
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Night at the recently completed Beech Center.Photography By Russell Munson
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On display in the Walter H. Beech hangar are oil portraits of the original Dynamic Duo of general aviation, Walter and Olive Ann Beech.Photography By Russell Munson
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**The G17S Staggerwing on display at the Beech Center is about as perfect a restoration as you’ll find. The multi-talented Jim Younkin did the handiwork along with Ray Keasler. Steve Parker of Odessa, Texas, donated his aircraft, serial num?Photography By Russell Munson
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Julie Clark flew a beautiful dusk airshow in her famous T-34.Photography By Russell Munson
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**Instrument panel of Beechcraft serial number one, a 1932 Staggerwing 17R of which two were built. Powered by a 420 hp Wright Whirlwind, the ship met its design performance goals of a 200 mph top speed and stall speed of 60. Such performan?Photography By Russell Munson
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**The Bonanza/Baron hangar has a wide range of aircraft from a straight 35 Bonanza to a V35B; a world circling Bonanza 3; a rare Super V; Travel Air; Baron; Twin Bonanza; Starship; and many more. In the foreground is a cutaway V35B.Photography By Russell Munson
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In addition to Travel Air biplanes and Staggerwings, the Walter H. Beech hangar has many historical artifacts including a cutaway Staggerwing.Photography By Russell Munson
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That’s not Johnny Cash in the back of the T-34. It’s Bob Burns, the Beechcraft Heritage Museum photographer, and his father didn’t name him Sue.Photography By Russell Munson
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Robert Parish flies the immaculately restored Parish family D18S up close and personal for the camera.Photography By Russell Munson
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The T-34 Owners Association descended on Tullahoma in force including many of the famed Lima Lima formation demonstration team.Photography By Russell Munson
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Bob Siegfried flew his Stearman down from Chicago, and it seemed to be in the air more than on the ground throughout the fly-in.Photography By Russell Munson
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**The first and last versions of the Beechcraft Model 17 Staggerwing. In the foreground sits the very first Beechcraft, a 17R serial number one looking just as seductively dangerous today as it did in 1932. In the background is Big Red, Dub?Photography By Russell Munson
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Flying weather was excellent for the last three days of the fly-in, and the sound of engines, especially radial engines, resonated deeply within the central nervous system of everyone within earshot.Photography By Russell Munson
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Members of the T-34 Owners Association fly an impromptu tribute to the museum.Photography By Russell Munson
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A Twin Beech D18S drops down on short final.Photography By Russell Munson
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**A 1938 F17D, serial number 250, prepares to land. Powered by a 330 hp Jacobs L-6, the F17D was built from 1938 through the beginning of WWII. The E, F and D-17 Staggerwings differed mainly in their engines. Suffix letter L designated the ?Photography By Russell Munson
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Oil and radial engines: it is either pouring in or dripping out, or both. But when you hear one start up, all is forgiven.Photography By Russell Munson