Different Ways to Learn to Fly

The stories of five pilots who took five very different pilot training routes.

fly0711_ways1.jpg
To reach his goal of becoming a Blue Angel, Lt. Rob Kurrle needed a high score from his primary military flight training. For more, see Pia's feature, "Five Ways to Learn to Fly."
fly0711_ways2.jpg
After six weeks of initial ground training, Rob completed nearly a month of additional ground training to learn the systems of his trainer, the T-34C Turbo-Mentor — a complex single-engine turboprop airplane that cruises at around 180 knots. For more, see Pia's feature, "Five Ways to Learn to Fly."
fly0711_ways5.jpg
Greg Oswald’s university training prepared him well to become a demo pilot. For more, see Pia's feature, "Five Ways to Learn to Fly."
fly0711_ways6.jpg
After completing his training, Greg instructed for a while before getting a job as a demo pilot for Eclipse and later flying the Challenger 300 and 605 for Bombardier. For more, see Pia's feature, "Five Ways to Learn to Fly."
fly0711_ways3.jpg
Ryan Thompson was able to become an airline pilot in about 1½ years. For more, see Pia's feature, "Five Ways to Learn to Fly."
fly0711_ways9.jpg
Ben Lee tried several flight schools before finishing training in his Cessna 172. For more, see Pia's feature, "Five Ways to Learn to Fly."
fly0711_ways7.jpg
Scott Evans inherited the aviation bug from his father, who was a CFI. He started training with him and eventually began helping him teach others ground school. For more, see Pia's feature, "Five Ways to Learn to Fly."
fly0711_ways8.jpg
A young Scott Evans refuels his father’s first airplane. Twenty years after Scott first began his flight training, he finally completed his dream of becoming a pilot. For more, see Pia's feature, "Five Ways to Learn to Fly." **
**