Amateur Rocket Launch

A homemade rocket reaches new heights.

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This rocket, a product of Copenhagen Suborbitals, achieved a successful launch last month from a platform in the Baltic Sea For more, check out "Homemade Rocket Successfully Launches." Photos Courtesy of Copenhagen Suborbitals
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The successful launch followed a failed 2010 attempt that went wrong, reports say, because of a human hair dryer. For more, check out "Homemade Rocket Successfully Launches."
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During the launch, proponents hoped the rocket would reach 50,000 ft, but it is not yet clear if it achieved that altitude. For more, check out "Homemade Rocket Successfully Launches."
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The flight lasted a total of 21 seconds. For more, check out "Homemade Rocket Successfully Launches."
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**During the launch, the rocket igniters failed on a first attempt, but worked successfully during a second attempt minutes later.
** For more, check out "Homemade Rocket Successfully Launches."
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On the test flight the capsule carried a dummy in the seating/crouching position that the would be human astronaut would assume. For more, check out "Homemade Rocket Successfully Launches."
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The craft is powered by a rocket motor using oxygen and polyurethane for fuel. For more, check out "Homemade Rocket Successfully Launches."
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The rocket/capsule cost just around $75,000 to develop. For more, check out "Homemade Rocket Successfully Launches."
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After the launch, workers retrieved the capsule, named Tycho Brahe, from the water. For more, check out "Homemade Rocket Launches Successfully."
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The capsule sustained some visible damage during the flight. For more, check out "Homemade Rocket Successfully Launches."
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Well known Danish inventor, Peter Madsen, plans to replace the dummy in the capsule after a few more successful unmanned flights. For more, check out "Homemade Rocket Successfully Launches."