Turbine Tech

Cutting-edge turbine engine technology is changing the face of aviation — and making the world a much smaller place. Here’s how.

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Photo Courtesy of Paul BowenPaul Bowen
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Pratt & Whitney Canada’s PW600 turbine engine family developed for very light jets is scalable from 900 to 3,000 pounds of thrust. Versions of the engine power the Eclipse 500, Cessna Citation Mustang and Embraer Phenom 100.
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With its Open Rotor technology demonstration program, Rolls-Royce is targeting the introduction of a family of superefficient propfan engines by 2025 that could boost fuel economy over current technology by 30 percent.
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Technology enhancements in GE’s TechX engine will stretch the range of Bombardier’s next generation of Global business jets to nearly 8,000 nautical miles.
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Rolls-Royce is evaluating new engine core technology, called E3E for “efficiency, environment and economy.” The goals of the program are to cut fuel burn by 15 percent and meet the future European emissions requirements.
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The inside of a turbine engine.
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Standard Aero technicians perform a core zone inspection — the old-fashioned way — on a GE CF34 engine, a mature design that powers a variety of business and regional jets built by Bombardier and Embraer.
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